Tag Archives: family

Just Asking… (Do you realize that visiting too much will weary your host?)

I read something the other night that compared visiting someone too much to overindulging with chocolate candy. That particular comparison never dawned on me; but as I mulled over the metaphor, I realized that the author made a valid point. In essence, he was suggesting that too much of a good thing can make you sick.

 

Don’t get me wrong, it’s wonderful to have friends and family with whom you can mingle and socialize. At times, it may be acceptable to pop in unannounced (depending on the person you’re visiting), but when you habitually  visit without an invitation, you are treading on thin ice. Even if the person doesn’t confront you directly, his body language may indicate that you are crowding him. He may become distant, even throwing sarcastic remarks that seem unrelated to what’s really bothering him. On the other hand, he may smile and say the right things, but his true feelings may reveal themselves in subtle ways.

 

You may be oblivious his subtle cues, and that only makes the situation worse. If he’s afraid of hurting your feelings, he will simmer in anger, or unexpectedly blow up at you for a seemingly insignificant reason.

 

Therefore, if there’s someone you love to visit, use wisdom. Don’t visit too often, and don’t stay too long. You always want your host’s doorbell to signal a welcomed guest and not an invading intruder.

Books by Levon

Just Asking… (What picture are you painting for your children?)

Children are a blessing. Some people believe this while others don’t, but regardless of one’s opinion, not everybody has the privilege to serve as a parent (biological or otherwise). The awesome thing about being a parent is that a person is making an impression on young minds. He is painting a picture of what the world is like. That person is doing so by his words and actions. Even when a parent isn’t aware that he is painting a picture for his children, that person is adding a stroke to the page of life each and every day.

 

As you examine the life you live before your children, what story are you telling? Are you teaching your children that honesty and integrity are important characteristics? Are you telling them that it is all right to violate valuable principles as long as they get what they want? Are you showing them that stepping on others is the way to success? Are you teaching them to be afraid to spread their wings and try new things? Are you ridiculing them and planting words within them that make them feel useless? Are you provoking them to anger by the way you live? Are you nurturing them and showing them they are valuable just as they are? Are you living a life that you want mimicked by your little ones?

 

As it’s been said numerous times, your actions speak louder than your words. When young, your children have the tendency to mimic what you do more than listening to what you say. The lifestyle you live may have an impact on them as long as they live.

 

Knowing this, be cautious of the picture you’re painting for your children. Yes, you have to live your life, but know that small ones are watching, and they will be affected by the story you paint. So paint a picture that you won’t be ashamed to pass on to the next generation, because you are passing a story on, whether you are aware of it or not.

Books by Levon

Just Asking… (Do you respect those you say you love?)

It is easy for a person to take those he says he loves for granted. Most of the time, he spends a lot of time with his loved ones, and they are familiar to him. He expects them to be available to him, and he expects them to fulfill their roles. Instead of being appreciative of what they do, in his mind, he assumes things will get done, and if they aren’t, he is quick to complain. He may feel that they know how he likes things and because a pattern has been established, he wants things completed just as they always have been.

If a person is living with this mentality, he is living on a slippery slope. It is never wise to take loved ones for granted. Yes, they may have various roles that they fulfill, but it is always good to stop and acknowledge what they do. Just because someone is a loved one, that doesn’t give a person a right to disrespect him or her. In fact, that person should be honored or esteemed.

In many instances, this is not the case. A person may honor and esteem those they want to impress, but fail to honor those who are with him day in and day out. He may go out of his way to do for others but neglect his loved ones who are with him on a regular basis. He may go the extra mile for acquaintances or strangers, but he fails to recognize and appreciate those in his household.

If you find yourself guilty of this infraction, change it today. Honor those who you say you love. Show them appreciation and respect. Give them words of encouragement. Do your best to impress them as much as you attempt to impress others. Just remember, a little respect goes a long way.

Books by Levon